Days of our Lives

Soap Star News: A Martinez And The Baseball Moment That Changed His Life

Baseball is an all-American game like nothing else and even in the middle of a deadly pandemic, we were determined to see some sort of…

A MartinezA Martinez


Baseball is an all-American game like nothing else and even in the middle of a deadly pandemic, we were determined to see some sort of season this year. For generations, baseball and baseball greats have given us thrilling moments, and one thrilling moment at Dodger Stadium when soap veteran A Martinez was young changed his entire life.

Let A Martinez, who last appeared on Days of Our Lives as Eduardo just two weeks ago, and is best known for his role as Cruz Castillo on Santa Barbara, tell it himself, as he did via Instagram, yesterday.

A Martinez Has Quite A Story

“My homeboy #DaveRobertson just gifted me with this treasure — the August 2, 1963 issue of LIFE magazine, featuring Dodger legend Sandy Koufax on the cover. Koufax is a hero to me on many levels, both as an athlete and a man of principle,” Martinez wrote. “He endured a bigoted manager who is said to have never spoken his name-calling him “the lefty” — but that didn’t stop Koufax from refusing to pitch on a Jewish holiday during the World Series.

“He threw complete game no-hitters in four consecutive seasons — the last of them a perfect game — during which he faced twenty-seven Chicago Cubs and retired every single one of them. That legendary performance occurred on September 9, 1965 — and I was a witness to it from a front-row seat in the third level at Dodger Stadium, looking down on the home team dugout.

“The opposing pitcher, Bob Hendley, threw the greatest game of his life as well that night — a one-hitter — but suffered the loss. The concession stands were shut down early so that the workers could watch. Koufax struck out the last six batters he faced — throwing nothing but fastballs.

“The stands were hushed on every pitch and exploded into delirium on every strike. He threw so hard on some pitches that his cap literally jumped off his head. There was a sense of watching a man reach beyond himself — willing to spend a piece of his future for the sake of realizing a transcendent moment — and Sandy’s sudden retirement after only one more season would validate that sense.

“Years later I would be offered a role in a student film — for no pay — a role that included a scene of my character and his father talking about watching Koufax pitch. Though I was broke, and my life a mess at the time, my brother Billy reminded me that I had no choice but to say yes to the gig. “If you don’t do it, somebody else is going to get play that scene…”

“So I said yes, and on that “non-paying” job, I met a camera operator by the name of Leslie Bryans, who became my wife and the love of my life. Our wonderful children would not have been born — were it not for the magic of Sandy Koufax. So thanks, Dave, for sharing this treasure, and helping me remember.”

 

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My homeboy #DaveRobertson just gifted me with this treasure — the August 2, 1963 issue of LIFE magazine, featuring Dodger legend Sandy Koufax on the cover. Koufax is a hero to me on many levels, both as an athlete and a man of principle. He endured a bigoted manager who is said to have never spoken his name — calling him “the lefty” — but that didn’t stop Koufax from refusing to pitch on a Jewish holiday during the World Series. He threw complete game no-hitters in four consecutive seasons — the last of them a perfect game — during which he faced twenty-seven Chicago Cubs and retired every single one of them. That legendary performance occurred on September 9, 1965 — and I was a witness to it from a front row seat in the third level at Dodger Stadium, looking down on the home team dugout. The opposing pitcher, Bob Hendley, threw the greatest game of his life as well that night — a one hitter — but suffered the loss. The concession stands were shut down early, so that the workers could watch. Koufax struck out the last six batters he faced — throwing nothing but fastballs. The stands were hushed on every pitch, and exploded into delirium on every strike. He threw so hard on some pitches that his cap literally jumped off his head. There was a sense of watching a man reach beyond himself — willing to spend a piece of his future for the sake of realizing a transcendent moment — and Sandy’s sudden retirement after only one more season would validate that sense. Years later I would be offered a role in a student film — for no pay — a role that included a scene of my character and his father talking about watching Koufax pitch. Though I was broke, and my life a mess at the time, my brother Billy reminded me that I had no choice but to say yes to the gig. “If you don’t do it, somebody else is going to get play that scene…” So I said yes, and on that “non-paying” job, I met a camera operator by the name of Leslie Bryans, who became my wife and the love of my life. Our wonderful children would not have been born — were it not for the magic of Sandy Koufax. So thanks, Dave, for sharing this treasure, and helping me remember. #Koufax #Dodgers #Baseball

A post shared by A Martinez (@abonemartinez) on

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